Rock and Popular Music Fall 2014

Traditionally, university music programs have focused on Western concert music of the great classical composers, and courses have been designed to prepare students as performers, composers, or educators within that tradition. 

However, beginning in Fall 2014, the Department of Music will be accepting students into its new, groundbreaking Bachelor of Arts degree track with an emphasis in Rock and Popular Music. The track was created to address the needs of students interested in areas outside of the traditional arena. This is a new approach in academic music education, with few other programs nationally like it.

In the new B.A. track, students will be able to audition and take lessons on the instrument and in the genre with which they are most familiar. Performance requirements will be met by the new “Popular Music Ensemble” course (MUS 119), which will be organized as bands with flexible instrumentation. Instrumental instruction will be in a wide range of popular styles and techniques. The goal will be for the students to acquire the highest level of professional skills, equipping them to succeed on a practical level in the contemporary musical environment.

While taking the same core music education, the primary focus of these new students in such areas as instrument study, participation in ensembles, and study of music theory will be in the area of rock and popular music. Courses within the track will include song writing, recording and production techniques, and historical approaches to popular music (both in America and around the world). Nevertheless, students in the new program will also enroll in the core curriculum, which forms the foundation for all music students and which provides a thorough grounding in the traditional subjects, including music theory, musicianship, keyboard skills, and music history.  As a complement to their specialized studies, this track allows students to take electives in other areas, such as business, engineering, arts administration, or any other field in the University that may suit their individual interests.

The motivating belief behind this new approach is the idea that a wider range of students, regardless of their background, previous experience, or the specific style of music that inspires them, can benefit from an academic musical education.  It seems fitting that CSU, with its position as a major urban university in a storied and vibrant center of American popular music, should be out in front in this effort.

Chemical Dependency

Cleveland State University School of Social Work is now offering classes in Chemical Dependency

When you walk past the rear of a bus in Cuyahoga County these days, you may encounter a sign that reads, “Death by heroin overdose in Cuyahoga County has quadrupled.” It is true—there is a heroin epidemic locally, and CSU stands prepared to help. As part of its ongoing commitment to engaged learning and responsiveness to the needs of the local community, CSU has been on the cutting edge of educational innovation aimed to address chemical dependency.

CSU’s School of Social Work and the Educational Counseling department have collaborated to offer two valuable options for students interested in Chemical Dependency counseling. The first offering is a five-class, 12-credit Chemical Dependency Counseling certificate program available to graduate students in education counseling or social work. This master’s level certificate program was the first in the state to be accredited by the Ohio Board of Chemical Dependency Professionals (OBCDP) since it meets the educational requirements necessary for licensure by the OBCDP. This certificate program is an excellent way for students interested in chemical dependency counseling to expand their professional repertoire and gain marketable skills and experience in the growing field of addictions counseling. Although additional requirements for licensure exist (such as passing a licensure exam and completing a certain number of client contact hours), this certificate program covers all of the educational content required by the OBCDP for Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor (LCDC) II and III as well as Licensed Independent Chemical Dependency Counselor (LICDC) licensure.

A second, newly developed curricular offering is the Chemical Dependency Counseling Assistant (CDCA) program, which is an online two-course (5 credits) sequence that provides the educational content required for a Chemical Dependency Counseling Assistant endorsement by the OBCDP.  Of particular value, this program allows students with no prior experience in counseling to complete the sequence and to apply for their CDCA certification. This will allow undergraduate or graduate students in any field of practice (for example, occupational therapy, physical therapy, nursing, education, sociology, psychology, health science) to complete the coursework for this endorsement. For CDCA endorsement by the OBCDP, which is renewable for life, students have only to complete the two-course sequence, fill out an application, pay a $50 application fee to the OBCDP, and complete a felony history statement.  No additional experience or examinations are required. CSU is excited to offer students this endorsement, which will not only enrich their professional practice but will also distinguish their resume. 

This program exemplifies CSU’s commitment to the joint goals of preparing students to secure employment while also providing service to the local community. For more information please contact one of the Program Coordinators, Professor Elliott Ingersoll (r.ingersoll@csuohio.edu) or Associate Professor Patricia Stoddard Dare (p.stoddarddare@csuohio.edu).

Why would a student want to take these classes?

  • This program will allow students to earn the right to place the letters CDCA after their name.
  • It will allow students in any field to learn more  about chemical dependency related issues for professional or personal reasons.
  • It will allow students whose major makes it difficult to obtain a license an opportunity to work in the field as a counseling professional.
  • It will provide students with the necessary credential to obtain an entry-level job in the addictions field.
  • Given the widespread occurrence of substance use disorders, it will provide workers in almost any field the knowledge to intervene on a basic level with a client or co-worker who is impacted by chemical dependency.
  • It will allow students to distinguish their resume.
  • It makes students more marketable when they are applying for a field practicum.

Bringing Henrietta to Life

CLASS Dean’s Diversity Council brought you Bringing Henrietta to Life April 12, 2014

The College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (CLASS) houses two schools and eleven departments, is home to about 150 full-time faculty members, and offers both graduate and undergraduate degree programs in the fine arts, humanities, and social sciences. It is, by nature, diverse. As such, the goal of the CLASS Dean’s Diversity Council is not to foster diversity but to incorporate understanding of diversity and inclusion by engaging in curricular / co-curricular transformation appropriate to disciplines within the college.

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Holly Holsinger, Adrienne Gosselin; Diversity Council chairs:

The Council’s first action would be to create research and curricular opportunities that explored the potential of the arts in the newly burgeoning field of medical humanities,  and their strategic plan was to produce a conference that engaged dialogue on health disparities. The one-day event would feature the premiere of Bringing Henrietta to Life, a film using music, dance, theatre and film to demonstrate the potential of art as an instructional tool to educate compassion and empathy in medical and health education. The audience would include CSU students and faculty, as well as members of the health professions and Cleveland community.

On Saturday, April 12, the ground floor of the Moot Court Room in the College of Law was filled to capacity and the balcony opened to accommodate nearly 250 people who came to attend “Bringing Henrietta to Life: Sustaining Dialogue in the Arts and Medical Humanities.”

From their inception, both the film and the conference have modeled interdisciplinary approaches to problem solving. The film began its life as an interdisciplinary collaboration between four CLASS faculty. Conceived in 2011 by Holly Holsinger as a creative response to The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, the text selected for the Common Reading Experience, “Bringing Henrietta to Life: The Art of Adaptation” was developed as a theatrical performance in collaboration with Lynn Deering (Dance), and Adrienne Gosselin (English). In 2013, with the addition of Evan Lieberman (Communication) and funding from the Department of Theatre and Dance and the Office of Inclusion and Multicultural Engagement, the theatrical performance evolved into a film. Like the theatrical performance, the film was to be made entirely by CLASS students majoring in theatre, dance, technical theatre, and digital film.

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Linda Wolf, Adrienne Gosselin and Matthew Green

Collaboration with Diversity Councils from the Colleges of Law, Sciences and Health Professions, and the School of Nursing broadened interdisciplinary outreach by identifying faculty interested in incorporating the film and the text into curriculum. At the student level, Theatre and Film majors joined students from Nursing and Social Work in interactive, faculty-facilitated workshops on Institutional and Social Policy, Ethical Issues in Nursing, Health Disparities and Vulnerable Populations, and creating interdisciplinary curriculum based on The Immortal Life.

As educators, faculty involved in the project came to a realization that, if diversity means difference, inclusion is what is done with the differences. In that sense, HeLa cells became a metaphor for the project, which continues to grow on its accord. Bringing Henrietta to Life will become part of the EngagedScholarship@CSU website and will include not only the film but also a teaching unit. Interdisciplinary faculty partners will share their classroom experiences, while data from the conference will contribute to collaborative research and publication.

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Social Policy Discussion Group

CSU CLASS visits China

On a rainy November morning at Guangxi University in Nanning, China, just north of the border with Vietnam, two faculty colleagues and I walked into a concert hall behind our hosts. After we seated ourselves, we listened to a concert of traditional Chinese music, played on traditional Chinese instruments, some of which had been hand-made by the Guangxi Music faculty. The students were dressed in colorful Chinese costumes, and the music they made was delicate and other-worldly. The music stopped. The students readjusted themselves, and they suddenly burst forth in a lively rendition of John Philip Sousa’s “Stars and Stripes Forever” on those same traditional Chinese instruments! It was a moving and almost giddy moment for the three American guests of honor. Later that morning, my colleague, Grammy Award-winning Angelin Chang, returned the favor by playing classical piano pieces for our Chinese hosts and giving a master class to some of their best music students. That morning, music built bridges that mere talk could not.

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This was just one stop on a successful 11-day, five-city tour that I took last November with my colleagues Dr. Qingshan Tan, a professor in our Department of Political Science and Dr. Chang. I had been wanting for some time now to open our college up to China, and over the summer of 2013 the opportunities arrived…all at once. The purpose of this particular trip was to explore partnerships with three different Chinese institutions of higher education: Guangxi University, Jilin University (in Shenyang), and Northeast University (in Changchun), each of which had previously expressed interest in cooperating with CSU. (We also had encouraging discussions with the leadership of the Shanghai Conservatory of Music.) At each stop, we typically met with deans and faculty leaders in the areas of music, English, and political science. The food and the hospitality were unparalleled.  The CSU delegation gave lectures or performances to eager student audiences.  (Dr. Tan spoke on Sino-American relations, and I spoke about the state of the humanities in America.)  A full range of partnership activities, including student exchanges, faculty exchanges, joint-degree programs, and summer programs were considered.  Moreover, several of the universities were interested in recruiting American students to come to China to teach English.  As an earnest on future cooperation, we signed Memoranda of Understanding with each of the three universities.

A trip like this, wonderful as it was, is only the first step in the long process of building active and productive inter-university partnerships. International partnerships, like flower gardens, need constant tending. Last year we were fortunate to have a visiting scholar from Jilin University, Ronglan Zhu, in our Department of Modern Languages. Next year we will host another such scholar.  These human connections are invaluable for making our ties concrete. In addition, over the spring semester I will be working with our colleagues in the College of Education and Human Services to craft a 2 + 2 + 1 program in English and the Teaching of English as a Second Language specifically for Chinese students and looking for CSU graduates who might be interested in traveling to China to teach English. These efforts will, we hope, fully integrate CLASS into the larger CSU initiative of building ties to that giant, ancient, and emerging neighbor just across the Pacific.

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Greg Sadlek
Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

At Home in Africa

Design, Beauty and Pleasing Irregularity in Domestic Settings

It is a humble wooden sandal that lost its mate, so heavily used that toe prints are embedded in its surface. Despite all odds, it made its way from Tanzania to Cleveland and will be on display during the At Home in Africa exhibition at The Galleries at CSU from August 27 through October 4, 2014. Curator Kathy Curnow, associate professor of African Art History, says that she and her “Home Team,” four student interns from the art department, want to throw open the door to Africa, inviting Clevelanders to appreciate a variety of domestic designs, as well as to gain a better understanding of lifestyle contexts.

Photo: Professor Curnow wielding a Swahili spoon.

“Many Americans are uncomfortable with Africa. Our past participation in slavery, unfamiliarity with the map, the legacy of Tarzan and the myth of ‘the Dark Continent’—all these have created barriers that distance and unease reinforce,” says Curnow. “The show’s not only about beautiful African domestic arts like furniture, pottery, baskets, clothing, and jewelry. It’s also about making people feel more at home, at ease, with the continent, by reminding them of the universal activities of human life. Objects have a lot of stories to tell.”

Graphic patterns and striking shapes certainly mark the items that will be in the exhibition. They include objects from CSU’s own Howard A. Mims African American Cultural Center collection, as well as loans from institutions such as the University of Pennsylvania’s Penn Museum, The Cleveland Museum of Art, Detroit Institute of Arts, University of Michigan Museum of Art, Kent State University, and others. “We’re waiting for final word from the Smithsonian,” says Curnow.

Photo: Four students are At Home In Africa interns, aka “The Home Team.” Left to right: Janet Purday (MA, Art History), Valerie Clark (Art History), Sharelle Sturdivant (Photography), Hannah Eaton (Art History).

Many students and alumni are already involved. Theatre students, under professor Russ Borski’s leadership, are designing and constructing architectural display elements for the gallery, recent grad Thomas Dang will create the catalogue layout, art education students are working with professor Andres Peralta to create associated teachers’ lesson plans, and communication students will be working with adjunct professor Eric Siler of ideastream® to produce a documentary about Africans in Cleveland and their memories of home.

“Supporting community partners already include the AIGA Cleveland chapter, as well as Global Cleveland. The Cleveland Council on World Affairs, the City Club of Cleveland, Facing History  and the Center for Arts-Inspired Learning are also involved with associated programming,” says Curnow. “We want to involve other interested parties to create an exciting welcome mat for the university and city communities. CLASS is generously supporting our digital efforts, and we continue to seek additional funding for the exhibition and its satellite projects.”

clevelandstate
clevelandstate:

Galleries at CSU showcase student standouts
Homegrown talent is proudly on display in two new exhibitions at the Galleries at CSU.
“Merit Exhibitions,” in the North Gallery, showcases works by recipients of Cleveland State Art Department Merit Scholarships. Among the artists featured are Dunya Abrahim, Yiyun Chen, Benji Diaz, Matt Kapela, Jeremy Kurth, Ben Rodriguez, Omid Tavakoli and Candice Vlcek.
The “43rd Student Show,” in the Center and South Galleries, features more than 50 works by nearly 40 CSU students, including drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, video and ceramics.
Read More

clevelandstate:

Galleries at CSU showcase student standouts

Homegrown talent is proudly on display in two new exhibitions at the Galleries at CSU.

“Merit Exhibitions,” in the North Gallery, showcases works by recipients of Cleveland State Art Department Merit Scholarships. Among the artists featured are Dunya Abrahim, Yiyun Chen, Benji Diaz, Matt Kapela, Jeremy Kurth, Ben Rodriguez, Omid Tavakoli and Candice Vlcek.

The “43rd Student Show,” in the Center and South Galleries, features more than 50 works by nearly 40 CSU students, including drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, video and ceramics.

Read More

clevelandstate
clevelandstate:

CSU production of Scab reopens old wounds
Scab, the latest production by Cleveland State University’s Department of Theatre and Dance, is set in a sparsely furnished apartment. But the action onstage doesn’t end there. This riveting psychodrama by award-winning playwright Sheila Callaghan takes theatregoers on a journey into the cluttered mind of lead character Anima (Katie Huskey).
Read More

clevelandstate:

CSU production of Scab reopens old wounds

Scab, the latest production by Cleveland State University’s Department of Theatre and Dance, is set in a sparsely furnished apartment. But the action onstage doesn’t end there. This riveting psychodrama by award-winning playwright Sheila Callaghan takes theatregoers on a journey into the cluttered mind of lead character Anima (Katie Huskey).

Read More

Study Abroad with CSU

The National Survey of Student Engagement identifies study abroad as one of the “high impact” learning experiences that can change a student’s life forever.

Ask any of the hundreds of CSU students who have participated in the study abroad programs directed by faculty from the Department of Modern Languages at Cleveland State University. You might hear stories of realizing a dream of visiting the Eiffel Tower, of bursting into tears at the breathtaking beauty of Córdoba’s historic mosque, or of snorkeling with nurse sharks in the Caribbean. Last year about 1% of CSU’s total student population took advantage of study abroad opportunities. They joined the ranks of the more than 283,000 students from the U.S. who studied abroad in 2012-2013.  According to the 2013 Open Doors Report on International Educational Exchange, that’s an all time high and part of a national boom in study abroad programs.

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Recent destinations for faculty-led summer programs at Cleveland State included China, France, Spain and Costa Rica.  Summer 2014 offers students the opportunity to earn 6 to 12 credits participating in study abroad programs that range from three to five weeks. With a focus on global competencies that includes intercultural skills in addition to language competence, our study abroad programs help prepare students to shift perspectives and consider culture from a world view other than their own.  An extended stay abroad, especially one living with a family that speaks little or no English, forces students to step outside of their comfort zones and into an unfamiliar space where intercultural learning can happen.
Study abroad is not just for foreign language majors. We invite students from all areas of the university to participate in these life changing experiences, and have developed curricula to appeal to students studying foreign languages and cultures as well as those in related disciplines where global competency will be a plus. Here are some examples of what you can do in the upcoming summers:

Our summer 2014 program in France takes place in Clermont-Ferrand, the world headquarters of the Michelin Corporation.  Located in a region of South Central France known for its distinctive “puys,” or extinct volcanoes, this program includes a field study project that students design to fit their diverse interests. These interdisciplinary projects help them gain an intercultural perspective on their major whether it is French, International Relations, Urban Studies, Business, or Art History.

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Students participating in our Costa Rica program have the option of taking Spanish language and culture courses as well as courses taught in English that can count toward majors in Health Sciences, Business, Criminology, or Environmental Studies. Costa Rica’s unique mix of tropical forests, volcanic mountain ranges and coastal areas makes it a great destination for students studying the environment, Ecotourism, or Tropical Medicine.

The program to China, organized by Modern Languages faculty in conjunction with the College of Business and sponsored in part by the Confucius Institute at CSU, focuses on China in the Global Economy.  It offers students two tracks: business or contemporary culture.  All students take courses in Mandarin Chinese, tour companies in Beijing and Shanghai, and visit some of China’s ancient sites such as the Forbidden City and, of course, the Great Wall.

Students traveling to Spain (upcoming in summer 2015) will live with families in Salamanca, the best-known university city in Spain and one that boasts a rich and diverse history. The four-week program, with an option for an additional 4 days in Barcelona, offers students a wide range of courses while being immersed in contemporary Spanish life. Excursions include visits to Madrid’s museums and palaces, Segovia’s aqueduct, Toledo’s medieval quarter, and Santiago de Compostela, the destination of pilgrims from throughout Western Europe.

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The summer of 2015 will also offer students the opportunity to get to know Cleveland’s sister city, Rouen, located on the Norman coast in France. The birthplace of impressionism, Normandy is a historically important region known for its cuisine, cathedrals, picturesque beaches and port cities, and the role it played in WWII. Students take morning conversation classes with afternoons devoted to visiting sites such as the D-day landing beaches, Claude Monet’s gardens at Giverny, and the monastery at Mont Saint Michel.  Like the French program in Clermont-Ferrand, a five-day stay in Paris concludes the time abroad.

If you’ve already studied a language for several years in high school, consider adding a language minor. This additional credential will make you more competitive in a job market where global competencies are expected. Whatever your career path may be, engaging in study abroad is a transformative experience that shouldn’t be missed. For more details, check out the study abroad web site or contact the study abroad program directors listed above.

Summer 2014: June 15 – July 15
France (Clermont-Ferrand and Paris)
Contact Dr. Annie Jouan-Westlund

Summer 2014: July 4 – August 9
Costa Rica (San José)
Contact Dr. Matias Martinez Abeijon

Summer 2014: May 9 – June 9
China (Beijing and Shanghai)
Contact Qizhi Zhang

Summer 2015: June 3-29 tentative dates
France (Rouen and Paris)
Contact Dr. Tama Engelking

Summer 2015: July tentative dates
Spain (Salamanca and Barcelona)
Contact Dr. Stephen Gingerich

clevelandstate
clevelandstate:

CSU introduces new rock and popular music track
It’s a long way to the top if you want to rock ’n’ roll, according to AC/DC.
But the path just got a lot clearer, thanks to Cleveland State University’s Department of Music. Its new rock and popular music track for students pursuing a bachelor of arts degree in music is perfect for aspiring rockers and pop musicians. Launching this fall, it will be one of the few such undergraduate programs in the United States.
“The rock and popular music track at Cleveland State University is for all those people with a passion for music who have been left out by the traditional format for music education,” said program coordinator Dr. Greg D’Alessio, associate professor of composition at CSU.
Read More

clevelandstate:

CSU introduces new rock and popular music track

It’s a long way to the top if you want to rock ’n’ roll, according to AC/DC.

But the path just got a lot clearer, thanks to Cleveland State University’s Department of Music. Its new rock and popular music track for students pursuing a bachelor of arts degree in music is perfect for aspiring rockers and pop musicians. Launching this fall, it will be one of the few such undergraduate programs in the United States.

“The rock and popular music track at Cleveland State University is for all those people with a passion for music who have been left out by the traditional format for music education,” said program coordinator Dr. Greg D’Alessio, associate professor of composition at CSU.

Read More